Melting Vinyl: Bringing the cream of live music to Brighton.

Low

Thursday 31st January 2019

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At St. George's Church

Doors 7:00 pm

Price £29.50 + booking fee / £33.50

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Over the course of Low’s constantly evolving career, their exploration of minimalist soundscapes and divine harmonies have garnered an array of praise from critics. Low will release its most brazen, abrasive (and, paradoxically, most empowering) album ever: Double Negative, an unflinching eleven-song quest through snarling static and shattering beats that somehow culminates in the brightest pop song of Low’s career.

In 2018, the band Low have turned twenty-five. Since 1993, Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker—the married couple whose heaven-and-earth harmonies have always held the band’s center—have pioneered a subgenre, shrugged off its strictures, recorded a Christmas classic, become a magnetic onstage force, and emerged as one of music’s most steadfast and vital vehicles for pulling light from our darkest emotional recesses. But Low will not commemorate its first quarter-century with mawkish nostalgia or safe runs through songbook favorites.

Double Negative is, indeed, a record perfectly and painfully suited for our time. Loud and contentious and commanding, Low fights for the world by fighting against it. It begins in pure bedlam, with a beat built from a loop of ruptured noise waging war against the paired voices of Sparhawk and Parker the moment they begin to sing during the massive “Quorum.” For forty minutes, they indulge the battle, trying to be heard amid the noisy grain, sometimes winning and sometimes being tossed toward oblivion.

In spite of the mounting noise, Sparhawk and Parker still sing. Or maybe they sing because of the noise. For Low, has there ever really been a difference?

“Low have made one of the most impressive albums of their career and it still feels like their best work is ahead of them rather than stuck back in the past.” – Mojo

“Striking a balance between their majestic, slow-moving melancholy and harsher experimental noise.” – The Guardian